Democracy Now! interviews constitutional lawyer and Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald about the military pre-trial hearing now underway for alleged U.S. Army whistleblower Bradley Manning, who has been accused for releasing classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks. Greenwald comments on the possible strategy being put forth by Manning’s defense. “All the Manning [tribunal] hearings have been shrouded in secrecy,” Greenwald says, noting there may be more transparency in Guantánamo detainee hearings than there has been for the Manning tribunal. “Presumably, his lawyer believes that one of the best ways they have to keep him out of prison for the next six decades is to argue that he had diminished capacity by virtue of emotional distress over the gender struggles that he had, over his sexual orientation being in a military that had a policy of banning those who were openly gay, and so part of this emotional distress that they’re raising is designed to say that he should be excused of his actions because they were not the byproduct of full choice,” says Greenwald, who is openly gay, and has been writing extensively about this aspect of Manning’s case. “He is, and I don’t blame him at all, trying to do whatever he can to avoid having his life destroyed: Either being killed by the state or locked up in a cage for the rest of his life.”

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